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Conquering congestion in Canadian kids (and the whole family) this cold season

(NC) Every year millions of Canadians fall prey to the common cold, suffering through stuffy noses, sinus congestion, and sore throats. Children are especially susceptible - they catch twice as many colds as adults, and often develop complications like ear infections. There are few options to help relieve their symptoms – OTC cough and cold medications cannot be used in children under the age of six.

But there is an effective natural-source alternative to vanquish nasal congestion: nasal rinses, like hydraSense, are gaining popularity as modern science has proven that it is a safe•, effective and side effect-free way to relieve congestion in adults, children and even babies. Studies have even shown that daily use even helps prevent colds.

“The common cold is, unfortunately, an unpleasant staple of Canadians winters,” said Dr. Yvonne Chan, Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at University of Toronto, and Otolaryngologist at Trillium Health Centre and Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. “There is no cure and Canadians are increasingly seeking natural ways to relieve their symptoms. Nasal rinses are a great way to help prevent the common cold and relieve congestion for the whole family.”

The common cold hits children hard – the average Canadian child will catch five to seven colds per year. But some nasal rinses are safe*to use on babies and young children, so it's an effective way to relieve congestion in these youngest cold sufferers – great news for mom looking for a way to relieve her little one's stuffy nose.

Not only do nasal rinses offer relief from nasal and sinus symptoms, it also helps prevent illness – studies have shown that children on daily preventive nasal irrigation have fewer coughs, sore throats and congestion and get sick half as often as children not using the rinses. They also miss half as many school days and have three times less illness-related complications.

“Canadians are constantly exposed to nasty viruses in the cold season,” said Dr. Chan. “But if you use a nasal rinse like hydraSense regularly, it can actually help prevent colds from taking hold in the first place.”

* When used as indicated.

www.newscanada.com

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Sources: Ng et al. Why the common cold and flu matter: A look at prevention. http://pharma-com.sitepreview.ca/lessons/cccep%201065-2011-341-I-P%20Dec-Jan%202012.pdf. Accessed June 28, 2013.

The Common Cold - Symptoms. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/common-cold/DS00056/DSECTION=symptoms Accessed July 9, 2013

Rabago et al. Saline Nasal Irrigation for Upper Respiratory Conditions. American Family Physician. Volume 80, Number 10. November 15, 2009 http://www.aafp.org/afp/2009/1115/p1117.pdf

Slapak et al., Efficacy of isotonic nasal wash (seawater) in the treatment and prevention of rhinitis in children. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Jan;134(1):67-74. doi: 10.1001/archoto.2007.19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18209140 Accessed July 10, 2013


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